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Live And Let Die

 

 

Live And Let Die (1973)

Composer(s):
George Martin 

Released in:
1973

Reviews
Live And Let Bond
by
timdalton007 (August 30, 2008)
The music for the film marks a milestone in the Bond films. This was the first time ever John Barry didn't compose any music for the film. George Martin, a long time Beetles producer, was hired to the score and he created the best non-Barry Bond score until David Arnold's score for Tomorrow Never Dies 24 years later. The score has a great feel to it and doesn't feel dated at all. Martin is however guilty for leaving some of the action un-scored. The boat chase is for the large part un-scored, but when the music comes on the excitement. Martin does a very good take on the James Bond Theme and the film's score is built around an excellent main title song. The song is an unabashed rock song but it fits the style of Martinís score.

The best of the non-Barry
by
Bret Wheadon (January 22, 2008)
The review title might sound too qualifying, when in fact this is a spectacular score - one which I put off purchasing, since it wasn't a John Barry effort, and the other non-Barry scores of the decade ("Spy Who Loved Me", "For Your Eyes Only") are universally considered the weakest of series. But "Live And Let Die" is thrilling for several reasons: first, and most apparent, is for Paul McCartney's seminal theme song, arguably the best of the entire film series; next is the judicious, and occasionally surprising use of the "Bond Theme" which George Martin incorporates throughout the score, often re-orchestrating it to good effect. This is a muscular score, distinguished by the touches of New Orleans jazz ("Just A Closer Walk With Thee" and slinky Jamaican rhythms ("Baron Samedi's Dance of Death"). The 2003 CD reissue adds EIGHT bonus tracks, all of which are stronger still than what appeared on the original album - a very welcome addition to the track lineup. The only weak tracks on the album are the two tracks which give nods to 1973 musical styles: "San Monique" and "Bond Drops In" but even these sound cleaner and brighter in the new remastering, and don't detract from the otherwise expert sheen which George Martin gives to the score. An excellent effort, and worthy of taking a place alongside John Barry's incomparable themes.



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